Tag Archives: Illness and Social Media

Does Social Media Promote Loneliness in the Chronically Ill?

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Loneliness is a very real problem among people these days, but more so with the chronically ill. Any kind of long term illness is isolating, but the world we live in today promotes loneliness. You might ask, “how can that be?” with the explosion of growth in social media. Although these types of media help make the chronically ill feel more connected to others, it actually can serve to isolate one from face-to-face meaningful communication which builds relationships. I think this is quite evident among younger generations who would rather text than speak to one another.

An article from The Huffington Post, titled “Seduced By Social Media: Is FaceBook Making You Lonely?” states: “The problem is multi-fold. The time we spend socializing online not only discourages face-to-face communication, but it also undermines our confidence at engaging in real conversations with real people about the real problems and issues that thread through our lives. Indeed, social networking provides a means of escape, an easy out on having to confront those parts of our lives we wish were different; more glamorous, and less mundane.” (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/margiewarrell/social-media-lonely_b_4034744.html) Although, I agree with that statement, I also know that without social media I would personally feel more of a disconnect with friends, family, and acquaintances. I live alone with a dog. My days can be pretty mundane and filled with pain with few distractions. More often than not, I welcome the distraction of FaceBook which is my favorite social media.

On the flip side, I do agree that if I were not an active user of social media and the internet, that it would force me into more face-to-face interaction or I’d spiral into despair! There are days that go by that I don’t see a soul, but I speak to friends and family daily over the phone. Yes, I still have a land-line … shocker! Chronically ill people need land lines to call for emergency medical service consistently and reliably. There was an informal poll taken in my Sunday School class regarding how many of us still hand land lines. I was one of three who confessed! I took notice of the reasons given why these women prefer text to talk and it comes down to being busy Mom’s with the unspoken hint of not wanting to run into the yuck of other people’s lives. Not because they don’t want to help others, but because they are so bogged down in their own lives they are hanging on by their fingernails trying to manage their own families! Texts are quick and efficient, communicating the bare minimum of information. Talk can be long, drawn out without communicating anything of importance but allows one to pick up on inflection of words, emotion, and other non-verbal communication types.

I truly try to monitor my FB communication and not post any Debbie Downer, woe-is-me stuff. This view does tend to support the Huffington Post’s article in that we don’t communicate honestly on social media about our real lives. Guilty here, but only by omission. Do I want to spill my guts on FB? I think not. I try to run everything I post on FB through the “What Would Jesus Post” filter because I want to use social media as a platform to witness to others. Rather than post anything too personal like the horrific pain I’m having, I would rather post a bible verse that is meaningful to me that day, something educational about health, or pictures of my dog that make me smile! I can’t even say I am posting it for other people. I mostly post for myself and if it touches someone else then I am blessed.

Please understand, if you need to vent about your disease, pain, family dynamics and illness on your social media page and it works for you, I’m not condemning you. I am sharing that it’s not for me any longer. When I did engage in that type of posting early in my disease it didn’t miraculously open anyone’s eyes to my suffering, but did leave me feeling like absolutely no one cared! My posts weren’t “liked”, commented on, or effective in any positive manner for ME. I happen to have encountered illness groups on social media where people benefited greatly from sharing about their disease but these were in private venues on social media where participants had similar symptomology not the mainstream, shared newsfeeds.

So, I’m left debating each sides of the argument here. Regardless of how you view social media and how it can be a way to escape loneliness or promote loneliness, I can say with certainty that you are never alone. As a Christian woman, I have learned that God is always there even when it may not “feel” like it. God isn’t up above somewhere out of reach. He is with His children as close as the air we breathe! His Word says, “I will never leave you nor forsake you” – Hebrews 13:5(b). In Sunday School today we learned that in the Greek, it translates, ” I will not, I will not, I will not let you down, leave you in the lurch, leave you destitute, leave you in straits and helpless, or abandon you.” (Stronger by Angela Thomas, p. 39-41). In this same study we looked at the apostle Paul and how he too was lonely during the time he was imprisoned, afflicted, awaiting execution by reading 2 Timothy 4:9-22. Paul chose to treat his loneliness by: asking for visits from godly and trusted friends, he asked for physical comfort from the cold, he asked for his books and parchments to keep his mind occupied, he forgave those who abandoned him, he reaffirmed his strength came from the never-forsaking presence of God, he kept his hope secure in Jesus Christ, he kept his worship focused on the glory of God, and he turned his thoughts away from himself and onto the welfare of his friends. (Stronger by Angela Thomas pg. 41).

What healthy actions might you take today to ease loneliness? I find that when I get out of myself and push my pain aside that I am most successful in combating loneliness by reaching out to someone else who is afflicted with a similar circumstance. God gave me a mission to, “feed his sheep” and I try to accomplish that by blogging about things I learn along the way (like this very blog you are reading), by calling members of my church congregation who are isolated or hurting, by calling a friend and asking them about themselves, by doing something nice for someone else even when I don’t feel like it, or engaging in bible study with friends. We can all do for others even if it is just buying a coffee for a stranger, putting a card in the mail, or just lending a ear without trumping woes with woes.

The debate will go on and on about social media and it’s detriment or contribution to society, but I do urge you that if you feel lonely in a household of people or as a 48 year old Dog Mom with lots of “yuck” in your life to reach out personally to someone. If no one else understands, find another member the autoimmune disease community with whom you can have honest communication. God made us for relationships. Specifically He made us for a relationship with Him! Rest assured you can tell God, your creator, anything. He can even handle your anger! Share with him the good, bad and ugly and soon you will experience his peace in your life amidst your problems. Pour your heart out to Him. He will never abandon or forsake His children. Learn of His promises by reading a good easy-to-understand version of the Bible. There are some great online Bibles now. God speaks to me through His Word.

How do you have a relationship with God? It’s as simple as A-B-C: A- admit you have sinned and ask for forgiveness, B – believe that God sent his only Son, Jesus Christ, to die for your sin so that you may have eternal life, C- confess with your mouth that Jesus Christ is your Lord and Savior.

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